Highland Park Employment Lawyers

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is committed to fighting for the rights of workers in Highland Park who may encounter discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful termination, or other unlawful conduct in the workplace. Additionally, our firm is well-prepared to offer small businesses in Highland Park cost-effective and practical solutions for employment law issues. With extensive experience in handling employment disputes from both the employee and employer perspectives, our team possesses valuable insights into the mindset of the opposing party. This unique perspective significantly contributes to achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. If you are facing employment-related challenges in Highland Park, whether you are an employee seeking justice or a small business owner seeking effective employment law solutions, the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is here to assist you. We are dedicated to providing exceptional legal representation and guidance to help you navigate these issues successfully. Please reach out to us, and we will be pleased to evaluate your case and discuss how we can assist you.

About Highland Park, California

Highland Park is a neighborhood in Los Angeles which is home to more than 60,000 residents.  It covers approximately three square miles and encompasses the following zip codes: 90041 and 90042.   Highland Park has a rich history and has undergone significant changes over the years:

Indigenous Inhabitants: Before European settlers arrived, the Highland Park area was inhabited by the Tongva people, who had a deep connection to the land and its natural resources.

Spanish and Mexican Periods: With the arrival of Spanish explorers in the late 18th century, the land became part of the Spanish mission system. In the Mexican era, after gaining independence from Spain, the area was part of Mexican land grants. The Rancho San Rafael encompassed the region that includes Highland Park.

American Settlement: Following the Mexican-American War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, California became part of the United States. In the 19th century, American settlers began to establish farms and ranches in the Highland Park area.

Railroad and Development: Highland Park’s history is closely tied to the expansion of transportation networks. In the late 19th  century, the completion of the Southern Pacific Railroad through the area facilitated transportation and brought growth. Highland Park became a desirable location for suburban development.

Annexation into Los Angeles: In 1895, Highland Park was annexed into the city of Los Angeles, contributing to the city’s overall expansion. This paved the way for increased development and urbanization.

20th Century Boom: Highland Park experienced a significant boom in the early 20th century. The construction of the Arroyo Seco Parkway (now part of the 110 Freeway) in the 1940s made it easier for residents to access downtown Los Angeles and contributed to the growth of the neighborhood.

Cultural and Economic Hub: Highland Park developed a diverse and vibrant community, becoming a cultural and economic hub in Los Angeles. It was known for its historic architecture, including Craftsman-style homes and Art Deco buildings.

Decline and Revitalization: Like many urban neighborhoods, Highland Park faced economic challenges and periods of decline in the mid-20th century. However, in recent decades, it has experienced a revival and gentrification, with young professionals and artists moving into the area.

Community and Arts: Highland Park has a strong sense of community, with local businesses, art galleries, and cultural events contributing to its unique character. It has also been a center for the arts, attracting musicians, artists, and creatives.

Today, Highland Park is a diverse and vibrant neighborhood known for its historic architecture, cultural diversity, and thriving arts scene. It has become a desirable place to live for its proximity to downtown Los Angeles, its unique character, and its sense of community. The neighborhood continues to evolve while preserving elements of its historical charm.

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is headquartered in Burbank which is just a few miles away from Highland Park.  Thus, our lawyers stand ready to serve employees and employers in Highland Park with all their employment law needs.

The Best Employment Attorneys For Highland Park Residents

Finding the right labor lawyer in Highland Park can indeed be challenging due to the variety of firms and their differing approaches. It’s important to understand that not every employment attorney will be suited for every case. Some lawyers may prioritize quick, low-value settlements, while others are willing to engage in more protracted legal battles to secure a full-value resolution. When conducting an online search for “Highland Park employment lawyer” or “wrongful termination attorney in Highland Park,” you may come across numerous advertisements from lawyers who are eager to take the easier route. At the Akopyan Law Firm, our Highland Park, California labor lawyers are committed to achieving the best possible outcome for each client, regardless of the complexity of the case or the effort required. Our dedication to delivering high-quality legal services means that we limit our practice to a certain number of cases, ensuring that each client receives personalized attention and is treated like family. We are proud of the exceptional personal service we offer, and we invite you to read what our clients have to say about their experiences with us. Our relationships with clients often extend beyond the duration of their cases, and our Highland Park employment lawyers fight passionately for our clients, as reflected in the excellent results we have achieved. If you are in search of employment lawyers in Highland Park, please don’t hesitate to contact us for a complimentary case evaluation. We are here to assist you with your employment law needs and are dedicated to advocating vigorously on your behalf.

We Can Help Highland Park Residents With All Sorts of Employment Disputes, Including Those Which Involve:

Featured Articles:

Does the Voluntary Submission to Acts of Sexual Harassment Prevent Victims From Suing For Sexual Harassment?

Sexual harassment, as per California state law, is defined under the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA). It is described as unwanted and sexually suggestive behavior or actions that create a hostile or intimidating environment. This could include unwelcome sexual advances, assault, battery, stalking, or credible threats of violence. It's also important to note that sexual harassment is considered a form of discrimination based on sex/gender, including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. Furthermore, quid pro quo sexual harassment occurs when a term of employment is conditioned on submission to unwelcome sexual advances. Both employers and employees are prohibited from harassing any worker, employee, applicant, volunteer, or independent contractor. It's worth noting that these laws apply not only to inappropriate conduct motivated by sex or gender but also to any unlawful reasons. In this blog post, we will explore this intricate issue, delving into the legal nuances and considerations surrounding consent, power dynamics, and the right to a harassment-free workplace. Meritor Sav. Bank, FSB v. Vinson, (1986) 477 U.S. 57 In the seminal case of Meritor Sav. Bank, FSB v. Vinson, (1986) 477 U.S. 57 a bank employee sued the bank and her supervisor at the bank, claiming that during her employment at the bank she had been subjected to sexual harassment by the supervisor in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. At the trial, the parties presented conflicting testimony about the existence of a sexual relationship between the employee and the supervisor. The District ... Read more

My Employer Did Not Renew My Contract. Can I Sue for Wrongful Termination?

Navigating the legal intricacies of employment relationships can be complex, especially when it comes to the expiration and non-renewal of employment contracts. In this blog post, we'll delve into the legal concept of Tameny claims and examine how the courts have addressed public policy tort claims based on an employer's refusal to renew an employment contract after its expiration. Tameny Claims and Wrongful Termination: 1. Tameny v. Atlantic Richfield Co. (1980) Tameny claims originate from the landmark California case Tameny v. Atlantic Richfield Co. This decision established that employees may have a cause of action for wrongful termination in violation of public policy when their employment is terminated for reasons that contravene fundamental public policy. 2. Public Policy as Basis for Tameny Claims Tameny claims typically arise when an employer's actions violate public policy principles. Courts have generally not allowed a public policy tort claim based upon the employer's refusal to renew an employment contract after its expiration. Tameny Claims and Non-Renewal of Contracts: 1. Daly v. Exxon Corp. (1997) In the case of Daly v. Exxon Corp., the court held that a public policy tort claim, under Tameny, cannot be sustained based solely on an employer's decision not to renew an employment contract after its expiration. The court emphasized the importance of distinguishing between termination decisions and the expiration of fixed-term contracts. 2. Touchstone Television Productions v. Sup.Ct. (Sheridan) (2012) Touchstone Television Productions reinforced the notion that a cause of action for wrongful termination in violation of public policy ... Read more

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Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision