Sunland Employment Attorneys

The trial attorneys of the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stand ready to fight for the rights of the residents of Sunland, regardless of whether they are employees or employers.  If your cause is just and involves employment law, give us a call to see how we can help.

Sunland, California

Sunland is a neighborhood in Los Angeles with a storied past. Sunland began as Monte Vista in 1885, when 2,200 acres of the Tejunga Park tract were subdivided into lots. One of the first uses of the new tract was the planting of 40 acres of olives, which made it the largest olive orchard in Los Angeles County. By 1906, the appellation “Sunland” was being used rather than “Monte Vista”. A 1907 story noted that Sunland was the “first supply store, and a good one, about seven miles from the railroad” at San Fernando, at the mouth of the Little Tejunga and Big Tejunga canyons. By 1923, Sunland had a population of about 2,000 and an active chamber of commerce. The sloping hills of what was called the Monte Vista Valley were the site of vineyards for table grapes, and the town’s sole industry, a cannery, specialized in packing olives from local trees. After Tujunga was organized as a city in 1925, a move sprang up in Sunland to be annexed to the new municipality, but the idea was rejected “by a heavy vote” in October of that year. Most of today’s Sunland was annexed to the city of Los Angeles, effective August 4, 1926. Sunland is home to more than 16,000 residents and covers 4 square miles.  The neighborhood lies between the Verdugo Mountains and the San Gabriel Mountains. It is contiguous on the east with La Crescenta-Montrose. Sunland and Tujunga are divided by Mount Gleason Avenue, with Sunland on the west and Tujunga on the east.  Sunland is known for its stunning natural surroundings, with views of the San Gabriel Mountains and the nearby Angeles National Forest. It offers a peaceful and semi-rural atmosphere, making it an attractive place for those seeking a balance between suburban living and natural beauty. The neighborhood’s proximity to the Angeles National Forest provides numerous opportunities for outdoor activities such as hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding. The Tujunga Wash Greenway is a popular destination for walking and bird-watching. The neighborhood hosts an annual Sunland-Tujunga Fourth of July Parade, a festive community event with colorful floats, live music, and patriotic celebrations. The Sunland Veteran’s Memorial, located at Sunland Park, pays tribute to local veterans and serves as a focal point for community gatherings and events. The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is headquartered in Burbank which is minutes away from Sunland. Our employment lawyers stand ready to provide legal services to both employees and employers in Sunland.

Where Are The Best Employment Lawyer in Sunland?

Sunland, a thriving community, offers a variety of legal services for its residents. If you’re searching for an employment lawyer in Sunland, you might come across numerous paid online advertisements from lawyers across different locations. However, the challenge lies in selecting the right attorney who possesses the necessary expertise and experience in employment law. Determining whether a particular attorney is well-versed in employment law and has a strong track record in handling employment trials and litigation can be daunting when relying solely on online ads. It’s important to assess an attorney’s competence and commitment to their clients beyond these advertisements. At the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C., we bring nearly two decades of experience to the table, making us a reliable choice for Sunland residents. Our team of lawyers has a proven track record of success, representing both employees and employers effectively in various employment-related matters. We prioritize quality over quantity, ensuring that each client receives personalized attention and exceptional representation. Our approach is characterized by an aggressive advocacy for our clients’ rights. We believe in fighting vigorously to achieve the best possible outcomes, even if it means taking on formidable challenges. Our aggressive stance is driven by our unwavering commitment to justice and the welfare of our clients. With our offices just minutes away from Sunland, we’re well-positioned to offer prompt and top-notch legal services to the community. If you need an experienced and aggressive employment lawyer in Sunland, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re dedicated to providing Sunland residents with outstanding legal services based on our extensive experience, tenacity, and unwavering commitment to our clients.

We Can Help Sunland Residents With:

Featured Employment Case

Jones v. Lodge at Torrey Pines P’ship, 42 Cal. 4th 1158, 177 P.3d 232 (2008)

Employee sued employer and supervisor alleging that employer engaged in sexual orientation discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), and that both employer and supervisor were liable for retaliation under FEHA. After entering judgment on a verdict awarding employee $1,395,000 against employer and $155,000 against supervisor, the Superior Court, San Diego County, No. GIC811515, Richard E.L. Strauss, J., granted defendants’ motions for judgment notwithstanding the verdict (JNOV) and, alternatively, a new trial. Employee appealed. Defendants filed protective cross-appeal from original judgment. The Court of Appeal reversed, reinstated the original judgment, and affirmed. The Supreme Court granted review, superseding the opinion of the Court of Appeal. The Supreme Court, Chin, J., held that nonemployer individuals may not be held personally liable under FEHA for their role in retaliation, disapproving Taylor v. City of Los Angeles Dept. of Water & Power, 144 Cal.App.4th 1216, 51 Cal.Rptr.3d 206, and Walrath v. Sprinkel, 99 Cal.App.4th 1237, 121 Cal.Rptr.2d 806. Judgment of Court of Appeal reversed and remanded. The employer may be held liable for retaliation under the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), but nonemployer individuals may not be held personally liable under FEHA for their role in that retaliation; although FEHA prohibits retaliation by “any employer, labor organization, employment agency, or person,” the rationale for not holding individuals personally liable for discrimination claims under FEHA applies equally to retaliation claims. lthough the employer may be liable for unlawful discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), individuals working for the employer, including supervisors, are not personally liable under FEHA for that discrimination. In supervisor’s appeal from judgment on jury verdict awarding employee $155,000 in compensatory damages in retaliation claim under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), Supreme Court would grant employee’s request that it take judicial notice of five-page document entitled, “Proposed Changes to the Fair Employment and Housing Act for 1986,” which was allegedly included in material found in legislative bill file, although it was undated and unsigned, did not state who authored it, and did not appear to be a committee report, but Supreme Court would ultimately find the document to be of little or no help in ascertaining legislative intent behind language of FEHA prohibiting retaliation.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision