Sun Valley Employment Lawyers

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. represents employers and employees in Sun Valley, California, in cases involving employment law.

Sun Valley Labor Lawyer

Sun Valley is a neighborhood in the City of Los Angeles.  The neighborhood is located in the San Fernando Valley and covers an area of almost ten square miles.  According to estimates of the Los Angeles Department of City Planning, more than 80,000 people call Sun Valley their home.  Sun Valley falls within the following two zip codes: 91352 and 91353. Sun Valley has a history marked by its agricultural beginnings, suburban development, and ties to the aviation industry. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the area was predominantly used for farming and ranching, benefiting from its fertile soil. During World War II, the establishment of the Lockheed Air Terminal (now Bob Hope Airport) in nearby Burbank played a pivotal role in the neighborhood’s history. Post-war suburban development saw the construction of residential neighborhoods, schools, and shopping centers to accommodate a growing population drawn by the promise of suburban living and job opportunities in the aviation and aerospace sectors. The neighborhood’s proximity to aerospace facilities like Lockheed Aircraft Corporation continued to shape its development and employment landscape. Sun Valley’s population became increasingly diverse over the years, and it now offers a range of parks and recreational facilities for its residents. Today, Sun Valley is a dynamic and evolving community with a mix of residential, commercial, and industrial areas, reflecting its history of transformation and growth. The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is headquartered in the City of Los Angeles. From our main office in Los Angeles, we provide legal services to employees and employers in Sun Valley, California.

Sun Valley Employment Laws

The employment relationship between employers and employees in Sun Valley is governed by a several distinct sets of local, state, and federal law.  Local laws governing places of employment in the neighborhood of Sun Valley include, but are not limited to the City of Los Angeles Wage Ordinance.  State laws governing the workplace in Sun Valley include, the California Constitution, the California Labor Code, the California Government Code, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (“FEHA”), the California Family Rights Act (“CFRA”), and the California Business & Professions Code.  Federal laws governing the workplace in Sun Valley include but are not limited to the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the National Labor Relations Act, the Labor Management Relations Act, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), the Americans with Disabilities Act, (“ADA”) and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”).

The Best Employment Attorney For Sun Valley Residents Are Minutes Away

For residents of Sun Valley, California, finding the best employment attorney can pose a unique challenge. Sun Valley, although a substantial and densely populated neighborhood with over six thousand residents per square mile, predominantly comprises residential and industrial areas. Consequently, the presence of law firms within Sun Valley itself is limited. When individuals in Sun Valley encounter legal issues related to employment, conducting a Google search for “Sun Valley employment lawyer” may yield results dominated by paid advertisements from other employment lawyers, often located in downtown Los Angeles or other parts of the city. This abundance of advertising can make it difficult for people to identify the right attorney for their specific needs. Selecting an attorney well-versed in employment law and possessing ample experience in handling employment disputes is not a straightforward task in such circumstances. Online searches for “Sun Valley employment lawyer” or “labor lawyer in Sun Valley” may lead to interactions with call service receptionists rather than direct contact with experienced labor attorneys. For individuals in Sun Valley who seek direct communication with a seasoned employment lawyer, the Akopyan Law Firm is readily available. Our team of labor and employment lawyers collectively brings over a decade of experience in employment law to the table. We have established a track record of success representing the interests of both employers and employees. We understand the importance of personalized service and the need for expert legal guidance in employment matters. With our main office in Los Angeles located just minutes away from Sun Valley, we are positioned to provide immediate and reliable assistance. If you are in Sun Valley, California, and wish to consult with an actual employment lawyer, we encourage you to contact the Akopyan Law Firm. Our dedication to quality legal representation and our proven ability to achieve positive outcomes for our clients set us apart in the field of employment law.

We Can Help Sun Valley Residents With Cases Involving:

Featured Employment Case

Light v. Dep’t of Parks & Recreation, 14 Cal. App. 5th 75 (2017)

Plaintiff Melony Light appealed judgments in favor of her employer, defendant Department of Parks and Recreation (Department), and her former supervisors, defendants Leda Seals and Kathy Dolinar, following orders granting defendants’ motions for summary judgment. Light argued the trial court erred by summarily adjudicating her claims against the Department for retaliation, disability discrimination, and failure to prevent retaliation and discrimination, all in violation of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA; **674 Gov. Code, § 12900 et seq.). She also argued the trial court erred by summarily adjudicating her claims against Seals for intentional infliction of emotional distress and assault and summarily adjudicating her claim against Dolinar for intentional infliction of emotional distress. The court also summarily adjudicated an additional claim against Seals, for false imprisonment, but Light didnot challenge that ruling in this appeal. As to the Department, the Court concluded that triable issues of material fact preclude summary adjudication of Light’s retaliation claim, but not her disability discrimination claim. Light’s claim against the Department for failure to prevent retaliation or discrimination therefore survived based on Light’s retaliation claim. As to Seals and Dolinar, the court concluded contrary to the trial court that workers’ compensation exclusivity does not bar Light’s claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress under the circumstances . However, as to the merits of that claim, the court concluded Light had raised a triable issue of fact only as to Seals, not Dolinar. It further concluded that Light has raised triable issues of fact on her assault claim against Seals. The Court therefore affirmed in part and reversed in part the judgments in favor of the Department and Seals, and the court affirmed in full the judgment in favor of Dolinar. Because our discussion of the interplay between workers’ compensation exclusivity and intentional infliction of emotional distress addresses an important legal issue, and our interpretation differs from a recent opinion by our colleagues in Division Three of this court, we will publish that discussion, as well as our discussion of the FEHA retaliation claim on which it relies. Because our discussions of Light’s FEHA disability discrimination and assault claims raise no similar issues, they remain unpublished.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision