Redondo Beach Employment Lawyers

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is fully prepared to advocate for the rights of Redondo Beach’s workforce when they face issues such as workplace discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful termination, or any other illegal workplace practices. Additionally, our firm is equipped to offer cost-effective and practical resolutions to employment law challenges for small businesses in Redondo Beach. Our extensive experience in addressing employment disputes from both the employee and employer perspectives provides us with a unique understanding of our adversaries’ viewpoints, significantly contributing to achieving the best possible outcomes.

About Redondo Beach, California

Redondo Beach is a city in Los Angeles County.  It is home to more than 65,000 residents.  It covers approximately six square miles and encompasses the following zip codes: 90277, 90278. Before 1784, Native Americans occupied the Redondo area. They lived off the sea and used the salt flats located where the Edison Company is today. This Native American land became Rancho San Pedro in 1784 when the California government made it part of a large land grant to the Juan Jose Dominguez family. In 1890, the Hotel Redondo opened. The City was becoming “The Place” for tourists. Railroads and steamships brought people by the thousands, not to mention freight loads of oil and lumber. At this time, Redondo was the first port of Los Angeles County. On April 18, 1892, Redondo voters adopted cityhood by a vote of 177-10. The first City Hall was built in 1908 at Benita and Emerald Street. Redondo’s population boomed in the ‘50s and ‘60s.  Still known as a tourist and resort town, Redondo can boast of piers with fishing and amusements, a Saltwater Lagoon reminiscent of the old plunge, many fine food restaurants and hotels, and a beautiful harbor. But Redondo today is not all fun and games. Some of the best and most innovative schools in the State are located in Redondo. Small and large businesses flourish, and City services are on a par with or exceed those of any other South Bay city. With offices in Burbank the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is just minutes away from Redondo Beach. Our employment lawyers stand ready to provide world-class services and top-notch representation to the residents of Redondo Beach.

How To Determine Who Is The Best Redondo Beach Employment Attorney

Finding the right labor lawyer in Redondo Beach can be a challenging task due to the numerous law firms and attorneys available in the area. Each firm may have a different approach, and not every employment attorney in Redondo Beach will be the ideal match for every case. Some lawyers may prioritize quick and low-value settlements over more protracted legal battles that could lead to a full and just resolution. When searching for an employment lawyer in Redondo Beach through online platforms, such as “employment lawyer Redondo Beach” or “wrongful termination attorney in Redondo Beach,” the results are likely to include numerous paid advertisements from various attorneys and firms. This makes it difficult for individuals to assess an attorney’s qualifications and experience solely based on these advertisements. The Akopyan Law Firm distinguishes itself by its commitment to achieving the best possible outcomes for every client, regardless of the complexity or effort required. We place a strong emphasis on delivering quality legal representation. While we limit the number of cases we handle to maintain our high standards, every client who chooses us becomes a part of our extended family. We take pride in providing first-class, personalized services and prioritize building lasting relationships with our clients that often extend beyond the duration of their cases. Our Redondo Beach employment lawyers are known for their passionate advocacy, as reflected in the excellent results they have consistently achieved for clients. If you are seeking employment lawyers in Redondo Beach, we invite you to contact us today for a complimentary case evaluation. At the Akopyan Law Firm, we are dedicated to fighting diligently for our clients’ rights and delivering exceptional legal representation.

We Can Provide Redondo Beach Residents With Advice And Counseling Regarding:

Featured Employment Case

Rivera v. NIBCO, Inc., 364 F.3d 1057 (9th Cir. 2004)

Female immigrants formerly employed at a factory sued the employer, alleging disparate impact discrimination based on national origin in violation of Title VII and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA). The magistrate judge entered a protective order precluding the employer from using discovery processes to inquire into plaintiffs’ immigration status, and the employer sought reconsideration. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, Anthony W. Ishii, J., 2001 WL 1688880, denied reconsideration, and employer brought interlocutory appeal. The Court of Appeals, Reinhardt, Circuit Judge, held that: (1) discovery as to employees’ immigration status would constitute substantial burden on employees and on the public interest; (2) burden on employees was sufficiently “undue” as to warrant protective order; (3) after-acquired evidence doctrine did not entitle employer to such discovery; but (4)  requested discovery would not violate Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) provision prohibiting document reverification. After-acquired evidence doctrine, which precludes or limits an employee from receiving remedies for wrongful discharge if employer later discovers evidence of wrongdoing that would have led to employee’s termination had employer known of the misconduct, did not require district court to grant defendant employer’s request for discovery related to plaintiff former employees’ immigration status, in action alleging national origin discrimination in violation of Title VII and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA); employer was not entitled to conduct a wholesale search for evidence that might limit its damages, and there was no evidence that employer would have fired any employees that were found to be undocumented. The “after-acquired evidence doctrine” precludes or limits an employee from receiving remedies for wrongful discharge if the employer later discovers evidence of wrongdoing that would have led to the employee’s termination had the employer known of the misconduct; an employer can avoid backpay and other remedies by coming forward with after-acquired evidence of an employee’s misconduct, but only if it can prove by a preponderance of the evidence that it would have fired the employee for that misconduct. Application of the after-acquired evidence doctrine, which precludes or limits an employee from receiving remedies for wrongful discharge if the employer later discovers evidence of wrongdoing that would have led to the employee’s termination had the employer known of the misconduct, depends upon context: the proper boundaries of remedial relief must be addressed by the judicial system in the ordinary course of further decisions, for the factual permutations and the equitable considerations they raise will vary from case to case. Before an employer may use “after-acquired evidence” to preclude or limit an employee’s remedies for wrongful discharge, by showing wrongdoing by employee that would have led to employee’s termination if known, employer must meet its burden of showing that, had it been aware of that evidence, it would have forthwith discharged the employee.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision