Rancho Cucamonga Employment Attorneys

Our seasoned employment lawyers are prepared to enforce and protect the rights of Rancho Cucamonga residents.

About Rancho Cucamonga

Rancho Cucamonga is city located in San Bernardino County.  Rancho Cucamonga covers forty square miles.  It is home to roughly 175,000 residents.  Rancho Cucamonga lies within zip code 91701, 91729, 91730, 91737, 91739. The history of Rancho Cucamonga begins with its establishment as a grazing site for cattle by the Mission San Gabriel. In 1839, the Mexican governor of California granted the rancho to Tiburcio Tapia, a wealthy Los Angeles merchant. Tapia moved his cattle to Cucamonga and built a sturdy adobe house on Red Hill. Following Tiburcio’s passing, the rancho was inherited by his daughter, Maria Merced Tapia de Prudhomme, and her husband, Leon Victor Prudhomme. After the Mexican–American War and the cession of California to the United States in 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ensured the preservation of land grants. In compliance with the Land Act of 1851, a claim for Rancho Cucamonga was submitted to the Public Land Commission in 1852, and the grant was officially patented to Leon V. Prudhomme in 1872. In 1858, Rancho Cucamonga changed hands when it was sold to John Rains. Rains, who had married Maria Merced Williams in 1856, invested in several ranchos and the Bella Union Hotel in Los Angeles. Tragically, Rains was murdered in 1862, leading to accusations and trials, but the case remained largely unsolved. Maria Merced remarried in 1864 to José Carrillo, eventually having nine children in total. The ranch’s ownership shifted again in 1871 when Isaias W. Hellman, a Los Angeles banker, and a San Francisco business syndicate acquired it through a sheriff’s sale. They subdivided the land, with Hellman continuing the cultivation of grapes in the famed Cucamonga vineyard, initially planted by Tapia in 1839. In 1882, George Chaffey, a Canadian from Ontario, purchased 8,000 acres of Rancho Cucamonga land, establishing an irrigation colony named Ontario after his homeland. This colony later evolved into the city of Ontario, incorporated in 1891. The northern part of Chaffey’s colony became the city of Upland, incorporated in 1906. Finally, in 1977, the communities of Alta Loma, Cucamonga, and Etiwanda, which had developed on the old ranch lands, merged to form the city of Rancho Cucamonga.

How Rancho Cucamonga Residents Can Find The Best Employment Lawyer

Rancho Cucamonga residents have various avenues for finding a reliable attorney to address their legal needs. Here are some options to consider:

Seek Recommendations: One effective way to find a trustworthy attorney is by asking for recommendations from friends and family. They may have had positive experiences with attorneys in the past and can provide valuable insights into their expertise and abilities.

Online Search: Conducting an online search is a convenient method to identify attorneys in your area. For instance, you can search for “wrongful termination attorney Rancho Cucamonga.” This approach allows you to access a list of potential attorneys who specialize in the area of law relevant to your case.

Billboard Lawyers: You might come across billboard advertisements for attorneys and law firms. While these ads can capture your attention, it’s essential to conduct further research to evaluate an attorney’s qualifications, experience, and track record before making a decision.

Regardless of the method you choose, the paramount consideration is verifying that the attorney you’re considering possesses the necessary experience, skills, and a history of delivering favorable outcomes for clients. Legal matters can be complex and challenging, making it crucial to have a competent attorney advocating for your interests.

The Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C., is a distinguished legal practice with a strong presence in Southern California. Our firm maintains offices in San Bernardino, Riverside, Orange, and Los Angeles, all just a short distance from Rancho Cucamonga. Our team of employment lawyers boasts nearly two decades of experience and a demonstrated history of effectively representing both employees and employers.

We are dedicated to providing exceptional legal services and top-tier representation to Rancho Cucamonga residents. Our commitment to quality and client satisfaction sets us apart, making us a dependable choice for addressing a wide range of legal matters, including wrongful termination claims. When you choose us, you can trust that you are receiving world-class legal support.

We Can Help Rancho Cucamonga Residents With:

Featured Employment Case

Smith v. BP Lubricants USA Inc., 64 Cal. App. 5th 138, 278 Cal. Rptr. 3d 587 (2021)

An African American employee sued the company and company representative alleging representative made several comments to the employee during presentation of company product that he considered racist and offensive in violation of the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) and the Unruh Act, and alleging a claim against representative for intentional infliction of emotional distress (IIED). The Superior Court sustained the company and representative’s demurrer without leave to amend. The Court of Appeal, Codrington, J., held that the employee failed to allege any facts suggesting concerted activity between employer, company and representative to commit FEHA violations; the employee sufficiently alleged that representative acted intentionally or unreasonably with recognition that acts were likely to result in illness through mental distress; and the employee plausibly alleged representative was acting as a business establishment.African American employee sufficiently alleged that company representative acted intentionally or unreasonably with recognition that acts were likely to result in illness through mental distress, as required to state claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress against representative, where employee alleged that representative made three offensive comments to him in front of about 50 of his colleagues, including three of his supervisors, that everyone except for African American employees laughed after first comment yet representative made two more that employee found offensive, and that representative said that he would not want employee’s “Banana Hands” on his car and that he could not see employee, which he construed as an unwelcome, racist comment about his dark complexion.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision