Palm Desert Employment Lawyers

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is prepared to advocate for the rights of workers in Palm Desert facing issues such as workplace discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful termination, and other unlawful workplace conduct. Additionally, our firm is ready to offer small businesses in Palm Desert cost-effective and efficient solutions to employment law-related problems. Our extensive experience in addressing employment disputes from various perspectives provides us with valuable insight into the mindset of the opposing party, greatly enhancing our ability to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients.

About Palm Desert, California

Palm Desert is a city located in Riverside County.  It is home to more than 50,000 residents.  It covers approximately twenty seven square miles and encompasses the following zip codes: 92210, 92211, 92255, 92260, 92261.   The City of Palm Desert, California, incorporated November 26, 1973, is centered in the heart of the Coachella Valley. Palm Desert is known as the cultural and retail center of the desert communities. In 1997, voters approved changing Palm Desert’s designation from general law to a Charter City in order to preserve the historical principles of self-governance and derive the resulting social, economic, and fiscal benefits from local control.

The Best Palm Desert Employment Attorneys

Palm Desert presents a wealth of options when it comes to finding the right labor lawyer. Numerous law firms are available to choose from, each with its own unique approach and style. It’s important to recognize that not every employee attorney in Palm Desert will be the perfect fit for every case. Some employment lawyers may prioritize quick and simple low-value settlements, while others are prepared to engage in a protracted legal battle to secure a full and just resolution.

An online search for “employment lawyer Palm Desert” or “wrongful termination attorney in Palm Desert” often leads to an abundance of paid advertisements from various lawyers, each vying for your attention. Sorting through this sea of options can be challenging, especially when attempting to discern which attorney possesses the experience and dedication necessary to effectively handle employment disputes.

At the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C., our Palm Desert, California labor lawyers are committed to pursuing the best possible outcome for each client, regardless of the complexity of the case or the level of effort required. Our dedication to delivering high-quality legal services necessitates that we limit our caseload to ensure that every client is treated like family. We take pride in offering first-class personal service, and our clients’ testimonials speak to our commitment.

Our relationships with clients often extend well beyond the life of their cases, demonstrating our dedication to their well-being. Our Palm Desert employment lawyers are passionate advocates for our clients, as evidenced by the outstanding results we’ve achieved. If you are in search of employment lawyers in Palm Desert, we invite you to call us today for a complimentary case evaluation.

Conveniently located with offices in Riverside, Orange, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles, the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is just minutes away from Palm Desert. Our employment lawyers are prepared to provide world-class legal services and top-notch representation to the residents of Palm Desert. When you choose the Akopyan Law Firm, you can trust that your legal matters will be handled with the utmost care and dedication.

We Can Help Palm Desert Residents With:

Featured Employment Case

Gavriiloglou v. Prime Healthcare Mgmt., Inc., (2022) 83 Cal. App. 5th 595 as modified on denial of reh’g (Sept. 20, 2022), review denied (Jan. 11, 2023)

An employee filed suit against her employer and its alleged alter egos asserting individual claims for Labor Code violations and a representative claim for civil penalties for Labor Code violations under the Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA). Following arbitration of individual claims, the Superior Court, San Bernardino County denied the employee’s motion to vacate arbitration award and granted employer judgment on the pleadings on the PAGA claim. The Court of Appeal held that arbitration award in the employer’s favor was not entitled to preclusive effect in employee’s later suit against employer under PAGA.  The opinion observed that “PAGA “empowers employees to sue on behalf of themselves and other aggrieved employees to recover civil penalties previously recoverable only by the Labor Commissioner …. [Citations.]” (ZB, N.A. v. Superior Court (2019) 8 Cal.5th 175, 185, 252 Cal.Rptr.3d 228, 448 P.3d 239.) “Of the civil penalties recovered, 75 percent goes to the Labor and Workforce Development Agency, leaving the remaining 25 percent for the ‘aggrieved employees.’ [Citation.]” (Arias v. Superior Court (2009) 46 Cal.4th 969, 980-981, 95 Cal.Rptr.3d 588, 209 P.3d 923, fn. omitted.) “Only an ‘aggrieved employee’ has standing to bring a civil action under PAGA. [Citation.]” (Moniz v. Adecco USA, Inc. (2021) 72 Cal.App.5th 56, 74, 287 Cal.Rptr.3d 107; see also Lab. Code, § 2699, subd. (a).) “Aggrieved employee” is defined as “any person who was employed by the alleged violator and against whom one or more of the alleged violations was committed.” (Lab. Code, § 2699, subd. (c).) “All PAGA claims are ‘representative’ actions in the sense that they are brought on the state’s behalf. The employee acts as ‘ “the proxy or agent of the state’s labor law enforcement agencies” ’ and ‘ “represents the same legal right and interest as” ’ those agencies — ‘ “namely, recovery of civil penalties that otherwise would have been assessed and collected by the Labor Workforce Development Agency.” ’ [Citation.]” (ZB, N.A. v. Superior Court, supra, 8 Cal.5th at p. 185, 252 Cal.Rptr.3d 228, 448 P.3d 239.) “In a lawsuit brought under [PAGA], the employee plaintiff represents the same legal right and interest as state labor law enforcement agencies — namely, recovery of civil penalties that otherwise would have been assessed and collected by the Labor Workforce Development Agency. [Citation.]” (Arias v. Superior Court, supra, 46 Cal.4th at p. 986, 95 Cal.Rptr.3d 588, 209 P.3d 923.) “[Individual] employees do not own a personal claim for PAGA civil penalties [citation], and whatever personal claims [individual] employees might have for relief are not at stake [citation].” (Williams v. Superior Court (2017) 3 Cal.5th 531, 547, fn. 4, 220 Cal.Rptr.3d 472, 398 P.3d 69.) Thus, in the arbitration, Gavriiloglou was litigating her own individual right to damages for Labor Code violations, whereas in the present PAGA action, she is litigating the state’s right to statutory penalties for Labor Code violations. It follows that the arbitrator’s findings cannot have preclusive effect.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision