Laguna Hills Employment Lawyers

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stands ready to fight for the rights of workers in Laguna Hills dealing with discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful termination, or other illegal conduct in the workplace. The firm also stands ready to provide small businesses in Laguna Hills economical and efficient solutions to problems involving employment law.  Our substantial experience in approaching employment disputes from both sides gives us rare insight into the mindset of the opponent, which truly goes a long way to achieving the best possible outcome.

About Laguna Hills, California

Laguna Hills is a city located in Orange County.  It is home to more than 30,000 residents.  It covers more than six square miles and encompasses the following zip codes: 92637, 92653, 92654, and 92656.   Laguna Hills is built on one of the major land grants developed during the rancho era. Following Mexico’s independence from Spain in 1821, those who had served in the government or who had friends in authority, were given vast lands for cattle grazing. Rancho Lomas de Santiago, Rancho San Joaquin, and Rancho Niguel covered much of the western portion of the Saddleback Valley. Don Juan Avila was granted the 13,000-acre Rancho Niguel on which Laguna Hills is located. In 1894, Lewis Moulton purchased Rancho Niguel from Don Juan Avila and increased the original grant to 22,000 acres.  Moulton and his partner, Jean Piedra Daguerre, used the ranch to raise sheep and cattle. The Moulton Ranch was eventually subdivided in the early 1960s, and part of the division became today’s Laguna Hills. Incorporation efforts began in 1987 and on March 5, 1991, 86% of the residents voted in favor of forming the City of Laguna Hills. On December 20, 1991, Laguna Hills officially became a City.

Your Search For The Best Laguna Hills Employment Attorneys Is Over

Selecting the right labor lawyer in Laguna Hills is indeed a crucial decision, and it’s important to choose an attorney who can provide the expertise and dedication needed to handle employment law matters effectively. Each lawyer at the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. offers nearly two decades of experience in representing both employees and employers.  The firm is well-equipped to handle a wide range of employment-related legal issues.  If you are looking for the best wrongful termination lawyer in Laguna Hills look no more. Our focus on quality over quantity means that we prioritize providing personalized and effective legal representation to our clients. We understand that each case is unique, and we are committed to achieving the best possible outcome for our clients, whether it involves discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful termination, or other employment law issues. With offices located just minutes away from Laguna Hills, we are ready to provide residents of the area with top-notch legal services. We invite you to reach out to us for a complimentary case evaluation, where we can discuss your specific situation and provide you with guidance on how to protect your rights and interests. Our commitment to excellence and our proven track record of success make us a trusted choice for individuals and businesses in need of experienced employment lawyers in the Laguna Hills community. You can trust us to passionately fight for your rights and deliver excellent results, as confirmed by the reviews from our clients. If you are looking for employment lawyers in Laguna Hills, don’t hesitate to contact us today to discuss your case and how we can assist you.

We Can Help Laguna Hills Residents With:

Featured Employment Case

Sanchez v. Swissport, Inc., 213 Cal. App. 4th 1331, 153 Cal. Rptr. 3d 367 (2013)
This was a case of first impression where the Court of Appeal held for the first time that the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) may require more disability leave for a pregnant employee than the Pregnancy Disability Leave Law (PDLL), and that leave until childbirth would be a reasonable accommodation for an employee’s inability to work during high-risk pregnancy.  The Court’s opinion noted that: The provisions of the PDLL are contained within the broader provisions of the FEHA. The PDLL provides that, “[i]n addition to the provisions that govern pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition in Sections 12926 and 12940,” an employer must “allow a female employee disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition to take a leave for a reasonable period of time not to exceed four months and thereafter return to work, as set forth in the commission’s regulations. The employee shall be entitled to utilize any accrued vacation leave during this period of time. Reasonable period of time means that period during which the female employee is disabled on account of pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition ….” (§ 12945, subd. (a)(1).) The PDLL further provides that “[t]his section shall not be construed to affect any other provision of law relating to sex discrimination or pregnancy, or in any way to diminish the coverage of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth under any other provision of this part, including subdivision (a) of Section 12940.” (§ 12945, subd. (b).) The regulations implementing the PDLL provide, in pertinent part, that “[a]ll employers must provide a leave of up to four months, as needed, for the *1338 period(s) of time an employee is actually disabled because of pregnancy even if an employer has a policy or practice that provides less than four months of leave for other similarly situated temporarily disabled employees.” (Cal.Code Regs., tit. 2, § 7291.9, subd. (a).) “If an employer has a more generous leave policy for similarly situated employees with other temporary disabilities than is required for pregnancy purposes under these regulations, the employer must provide the more generous leave to employees temporarily disabled by pregnancy.” (Cal.Code Regs., tit. 2, § 7291.9, subd. (b).) Thus, under the PDLL, an employee disabled by pregnancy is entitled to up to four months of disability leave, regardless of any hardship to her employer. (§ 12945, subd. (a).) Under the FEHA, a disabled employee is entitled to a reasonable accommodation—which may include leave of no statutorily fixed duration—provided that such accommodation does not impose an undue hardship on the employer. (§ 12940, subd. (m); see Jensen v. Wells Fargo Bank (2000) 85 Cal.App.4th 245, 263, 102 Cal.Rptr.2d 55 [“Holding a job open for a disabled employee who needs time to recuperate or heal is in itself a form of reasonable accommodation and may be all that is required where it appears likely that the employee will be able to return to an existing position at some time in the foreseeable future.”]; Hanson v. Lucky Stores, Inc. (1999) 74 Cal.App.4th 215, 226, 87 Cal.Rptr.2d 487 (Hanson ) [“[A] finite leave can be a reasonable accommodation under FEHA, provided it is likely that at the end of the leave, the employee would be able to perform his or her duties.”].)

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Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision