La Palma Employment Attorneys

The trial attorneys of the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stand ready to fight for the rights of the residents of La Palma, regardless of whether they are employees or employers.  If your cause is just and involves employment law, give us a call to see how we can help.

La Palma, California

La Palma is city located in Orange County.  La Palma covers less than two square miles but is home to more than 15,000 residents.  La Palma lies within zip code 90623. With 18 dairies dotting an area of 1.76 square miles, the City of La Palma in 1955 looked nothing like it does today. In fact, the City of La Palma was first incorporated as Dairyland and remained so until the dairies relocated. The name was changed in 1965 to La Palma in reflection of Orange County’s Spanish heritage and the City’s main street, La Palma Avenue. Soon after the small farming community began its life, City planners decided that the City should benefit from a long-term program for orderly development. he Civic Center and Central Park, now La Palma’s premier gathering places, were among the first projects to be completed to better the community. The City’s major redevelopment project, Centerpointe, added new commercial and light industrial uses in the early 1980s. La Palma is a well balanced city which prides itself on a responsive municipal government and a strong sense of community. The City’s small town character allows residents to live in quiet and friendly neighborhoods. With one of the lowest crime rates in Orange County, La Palma is a place where residents can rest easy and enjoy hometown living. The City has been ranked one of America’s Best Places to Live, by Money Magazine in 2007, 2011, 2013, and 2015.

Your Quest For the Best Employment Lawyer in La Palma Ends Now

La Palma is indeed a thriving community, and residents may have numerous options when it comes to legal representation. However, selecting the right attorney for your specific employment law needs is crucial to ensure a positive outcome for your case. Online searches for “employment lawyer La Palma” or “wrongful termination attorney La Palma” often yield paid advertisements from lawyers across various practice areas. It can be challenging for individuals to discern an attorney’s expertise and experience solely based on these advertisements. The Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C. understands the importance of choosing an attorney who is well-versed in employment law and experienced in handling trials and litigation. Each of our attorneys has nearly two decades of experience and a proven track record of success in representing both employees and employers. Our approach is centered on quality rather than quantity, which means we are dedicated to providing personalized and effective legal representation to each client. With offices located just minutes away from La Palma, we are readily available to serve the community. We pride ourselves on delivering world-class services and top-notch representation to all La Palma residents, whether you are an employee seeking justice or an employer facing legal challenges. If you are in need of experienced and dedicated employment lawyers, please do not hesitate to reach out to us. We are here to help you achieve the best possible outcome for your case.

We Offer Legal Services to La Palma Employers and Employes In Matters Involving:

Featured Articles:

My Employer Did Not Renew My Contract. Can I Sue for Wrongful Termination?

Navigating the legal intricacies of employment relationships can be complex, especially when it comes to the expiration and non-renewal of employment contracts. In this blog post, we'll delve into the legal concept of Tameny claims and examine how the courts have addressed public policy tort claims based on an employer's refusal to renew an employment contract after its expiration. Tameny Claims and Wrongful Termination: 1. Tameny v. Atlantic Richfield Co. (1980) Tameny claims originate from the landmark California case Tameny v. Atlantic Richfield Co. This decision established that employees may have a cause of action for wrongful termination in violation of public policy when their employment is terminated for reasons that contravene fundamental public policy. 2. Public Policy as Basis for Tameny Claims Tameny claims typically arise when an employer's actions violate public policy principles. Courts have generally not allowed a public policy tort claim based upon the employer's refusal to renew an employment contract after its expiration. Tameny Claims and Non-Renewal of Contracts: 1. Daly v. Exxon Corp. (1997) In the case of Daly v. Exxon Corp., the court held that a public policy tort claim, under Tameny, cannot be sustained based solely on an employer's decision not to renew an employment contract after its expiration. The court emphasized the importance of distinguishing between termination decisions and the expiration of fixed-term contracts. 2. Touchstone Television Productions v. Sup.Ct. (Sheridan) (2012) Touchstone Television Productions reinforced the notion that a cause of action for wrongful termination in violation of public policy ... Read more

Can Independent Contractors Sue For Wrongful Dismissal in Violation of Public Policy?

California's employment laws are designed to protect workers, but what about independent contractors? Can they sue for wrongful dismissal in violation of public policy? In this blog post, we'll explore the legal landscape in California and discuss the nuances surrounding the rights of independent contractors in cases of alleged wrongful termination (https://www.akopyanlaw.com/wrongful-termination/). Understanding Independent Contractors in California Independent contractors are distinct from employees in California. While employees typically enjoy various labor law protections, including the right to minimum wage and overtime compensation, independent contractors have a different legal status. Wrongful Dismissal in Violation of Public Policy In California, there is a public policy exception to the at-will employment doctrine, which allows employees to sue for wrongful termination in those cases where the termination violates a public policy. This exception is rooted in the idea that certain dismissals are so contrary to public policy that they should be legally actionable. No Application to Independent Contractors Caselaw provides that this public policy exception is applicable to employees but not independent contractors. The case of Sistare-Meyer v. Young Men's Christian Assn., (1997) 58 Cal. App. 4th 10 is instructive. The facts in that case were as follows: In 1991, Sistare Meyer entered into a contract with respondent Young Men's Christian Association of Metropolitan Los Angeles to provide a program of teaching, dancing, and tumbling at its Crenshaw branch. The contract was designated as an independent contractor agreement and provided that the contract could be terminated upon one week's notice. In March 1993, the ... Read more

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Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision