Indio Employment Attorneys

The trial attorneys of the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stand ready to fight for both employers and employees in Indio, California.

Indio, California

Indio is a city located in Riverside County.  The City of Indio is home to more than 90,000 residents.  It covers approximately thirty-three square miles, and encompasses the following zip codes: 92201, 92202, and 92203. The City of Indio came about because of the need for a halfway point for the Southern Pacific Railroad between Yuma, Arizona and Los Angeles, since the engines needed to be refilled with water. At first, the would-be city was called Indian Wells,  but since many other areas already had that name, Indio (after a Spanish variation of the word “Indian”) was chosen instead. After the railroad’s arrival in 1876, Indio really started to grow. The first permanent building was the craftsman-style Southern Pacific Depot station and hotel. Southern Pacific tried to make life as comfortable as it could for their workers to keep them from leaving such a difficult area to live in at the time. It was at the center of all social life in the desert with a fancy dining room and hosting dances on Friday nights. While Indio started as a railroad town, it soon became agricultural. Onions, cotton, grapes, citrus and dates thrived in the arid climate due to the ingenuity of farmers finding various means of attaining water. Businessmen and women found this last frontier land of the continental United States as an ideal place to start fresh. By the turn of the 20th century, Indio was already more than a fading railroad town. Schools were built, the La Casita hospital provided medical services, and families established roots. In the second half of the 20th century, Indio saw another decline as the valley’s population begin to move west towards newer cities such as Palm Desert. However, there is now a reversal in this trend.

The Best Employment Lawyers in Indio

Indio boasts a multitude of choices when it comes to legal representation, with countless lawyers and law firms vying to assist its residents. The challenge faced by both employers and employees in Indio when confronted with substantial legal issues, particularly those involving employment law, lies in the selection of the right attorney to champion their cause. The decision-making process is further complicated by the incessant barrage of attention-seeking radio advertisements and clichéd posters that adorn billboards, buses, and street benches throughout the city. In an era where most individuals turn to online resources for solutions, conducting an internet search for terms like “Indio employment lawyer” or “wrongful termination attorney in Indio” often yields results inundated with paid advertisements from lawyers clamoring for attention. While billboard lawyers may have their place and relevance in certain cases, there are scenarios that demand nothing less than top-tier representation from experienced legal counsel. At the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C., each attorney brings to the table nearly two decades of legal experience. Our lawyers have established a robust track record of success representing both employers and employees. Our firm’s ethos is firmly rooted in quality over quantity. Rather than devoting valuable time to recording catchy radio advertisements or pursuing other marketing gimmicks, our lawyers prioritize courtroom advocacy, relentlessly fighting for our clients’ rights. We don’t merely expect you to take our word for it; we are more than willing to provide client references upon request. Additionally, you can explore our online reviews to gain further insight into our firm’s reputation and client satisfaction.  With strategically located offices in Riverside, Orange, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles, the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is positioned just minutes away from Indio. Our team of dedicated employment lawyers is prepared to offer world-class legal services and exceptional representation to the residents of Indio. We stand ready to ensure that their legal needs are met with the utmost professionalism and effectiveness.

We Can Help Indio Residents With:

Featured Employment Case

Sandell v. Taylor-Listug, Inc., 188 Cal. App. 4th 297, 115 Cal. Rptr. 3d 453 (2010)

A former employee brought an action against the employer for disability and age discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA). The Superior Court, granted summary judgment for the employer. The employee appealed.  On appeal, the Court of Appeal held that: (1) the employee raised fact issue as to whether he was disabled; (2) the employee raised fact issue as whether performance issues proffered by employer were the real reasons for employee’s termination; (3) employee made prima facie showing that he was performing satisfactorily; and (4) the employee made prima facie showing of circumstances giving rise to inference of unlawful discrimination. The court of appeal explained that in the context of disability discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), the plaintiff can meet the initial burden to establish a prima facie case of discrimination by presenting evidence that demonstrates, even circumstantially or by inference, that he or she (1) suffered from a disability, or was regarded as suffering from a disability; (2) could perform the essential duties of the job with or without reasonable accommodations, and (3) was subjected to an adverse employment action because of the disability or perceived disability. o establish a prima facie case of disability discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), the plaintiff must show actions taken by the employer from which one can infer, if such actions remain unexplained, that it is more likely than not that such actions were based on a prohibited discriminatory criterion. To establish a prima facie case of disability discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), the prima facie burden is light, and the evidence necessary to sustain the burden is minimal.  To establish a prima facie case of disability discrimination under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), while the elements of a plaintiff’s prima facie case can vary considerably, generally an employee need only offer sufficient circumstantial evidence to give rise to a reasonable inference of discrimination.  Evidence of the use of a cane by one asserting disability discrimination is not necessarily insufficient to demonstrate that he or she suffers from a “disability” under California law. Under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), to discredit employer’s proffered legitimate nondiscriminatory reasons for adverse employment action, plaintiff must demonstrate such weaknesses, implausibilities, inconsistencies, incoherencies, or contradictions in employer’s proffered legitimate reasons for its action that reasonable fact finder could rationally find them unworthy of credence, and hence infer that employer did not act for asserted reasons.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision