Encino Employment Attorneys

The trial attorneys of the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stand ready to fight for both employers and employees in Encino, California.

Encino, California

Encino is a neighborhood of the City of Los Angeles.  It is situated in the center-south section of the San Fernando Valley and is home to more than 40,000 Angelenos.  It covers approximately ten square miles, and encompasses the following zip codes: 91316, 91426, 91416, and 91436.  Encino is an affluent suburb of greater Los Angeles.   Encino is Spanish for “oak tree.” Encino  has a history dating back to the early days of the city’s development:

1. Indigenous Inhabitants: The area that is now Encino was originally inhabited by the Tongva people, who were indigenous to the Los Angeles Basin. They had settlements in the region and utilized its natural resources.

2. Spanish Land Grants: In the late 18th century, the Spanish Crown granted large parcels of land in the San Fernando Valley to Spanish settlers. The area that includes Encino was part of these land grants.

3. Mexican Era: During the Mexican era of California (1821-1848), the land changed hands as California came under Mexican rule. The Encino area was used primarily for ranching and agriculture during this time.

4. American Settlement: With the conclusion of the Mexican-American War in 1848 and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, California became part of the United States. In the late 19th century, the region that is now Encino saw increased American settlement.

5. Rancho Period: Encino was part of the vast Rancho Ex-Mission San Fernando land grant. The Encino portion was owned by various individuals and entities over the years. The name “Encino” means “oak tree” in Spanish, and it was named for the abundant oak trees in the area.

6. Development and Suburbanization: In the early 20th century, as Los Angeles continued to grow, Encino transitioned from agricultural land to a suburban community. Residential development increased, and Encino became a desirable place to live for those seeking a quieter, suburban lifestyle.

7. Encino Reservoir: In 1921, the Mulholland Drive Tunnel was completed, allowing water from the Owens Valley to flow into the San Fernando Valley. The Encino Reservoir was constructed to store this water, which played a crucial role in the area’s development.

8. Post-War Boom: After World War II, like many other parts of Los Angeles, Encino experienced a housing boom. New neighborhoods, schools, and businesses emerged as the San Fernando Valley became a popular destination for families.

9. Cultural and Residential Hub: Encino has long been home to a mix of residents, including professionals, entertainers, and families. It is known for its tree-lined streets, parks, and easy access to amenities. The neighborhood also features historic landmarks like the Encino Oak Tree and the Los Encinos State Historic Park.

10. Modern Encino: Today, Encino remains a vibrant and affluent neighborhood within the city of Los Angeles. It offers a suburban feel while being conveniently located near the urban amenities of the city. The community continues to evolve while preserving elements of its historical character.

Encino’s history reflects the broader development and growth of the San Fernando Valley and the city of Los Angeles as a whole. It has evolved from its agricultural and ranching origins to become a thriving suburban community.

The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is headquartered in Burbank which is minutes away from Encino. Our lawyers are ready to fight to enforce the rights of either employees and employers in Encino.

Who is The Best Wrongful Termination Lawyer in Encino for Your Case?

Encino, with its diverse and vibrant community, presents residents with a plethora of options when it comes to legal representation. The city boasts numerous lawyers and law firms, all vying to offer their services to the local population. However, in today’s digital age, an online search for “Encino employment lawyer” or “best wrongful termination attorney in Encino” often results in a deluge of paid advertisements from lawyers representing various specialties.

Choosing the right attorney, one with the necessary skills and experience, can indeed be a daunting task when the decision is largely influenced by a paid internet advertisement. For individuals grappling with serious legal issues, particularly those rooted in employment law, the challenge lies in identifying the attorney who is truly the right choice for their unique needs. The constant bombardment of gimmicky radio ads and billboard posters only adds to the complexity of the search.

At the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C., we distinguish ourselves by focusing on quality over quantity. Each of our attorneys boasts nearly two decades of invaluable experience, complemented by a distinguished track record of success in representing both employers and employees. Our commitment is to provide clients with the highest caliber representation, tailored to their specific cases.

While some attorneys may opt to invest their time in crafting catchy radio ads, our attorneys prefer to dedicate their efforts to the courtroom, fighting passionately for our clients’ rights. We encourage you to explore our online reviews or request client references to gain firsthand insight into our exceptional track record.

When you choose the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C., you’re not merely selecting legal expertise; you’re embracing a commitment to delivering the highest standards of service. Your legal needs are our utmost priority, and we’re here to serve as your trusted advocates. If you seek legal representation that prioritizes quality and experience, we encourage you to reach out to us today for exceptional counsel and support. Your path to effective legal resolution begins right here in Encino.

Encino Residents Are Invited To Contact Us For Issues Involving:

Featured Employment Case

Lyle v. Warner Bros. Television Prods., 38 Cal. 4th 264, 132 P.3d 211 (2006)

A former writer’s assistant for a popular, adult-oriented television show sued the producers and writers of show, alleging causes of action under Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) for race and gender discrimination, racial and sexual harassment, and retaliation. The Superior Court for the County of Los Angeles granted the defendants’ motions for summary judgment. Plaintiff appealed. The Court of Appeal affirmed in part and reversed in part. The Supreme Court granted review.  The Court explained that to prevail under either Title VII or the Fair Employment and Housing Act an employee claiming sexual harassment based upon a hostile work environment must demonstrate that the conduct complained of was severe enough or sufficiently pervasive to alter the conditions of employment and create a work environment that qualifies as hostile or abusive to employees because of their sex.  The Court reiterated that to prevail under either Title VII or the Fair Employment and Housing Act an employee claiming sexual harassment based upon a hostile work environment must show she was subjected to sexual advances, conduct, or comments that were (1) unwelcome, (2) because of sex, and (3) sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of her employment and create an abusive work environment, and she must also establish the offending conduct was imputable to her employer. The Court also explained that a hostile work environment sexual harassment claim under the Fair Employment and Housing Act is not established where a supervisor or coworker simply uses crude or inappropriate language in front of employees or draws a vulgar picture, without directing sexual innuendos or gender-related language toward a plaintiff or toward women in general.  To establish liability in a Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) hostile work environment sexual harassment case, a plaintiff employee must show she was subjected to sexual advances, conduct, or comments that were severe enough or sufficiently pervasive to alter the conditions of her employment and create a hostile or abusive work environment; although annoying or “merely offensive” comments in the workplace are not actionable, conduct that is severe or pervasive enough to create an objectively hostile or abusive work environment is unlawful, even if it does not cause psychological injury to the plaintiff. To be actionable as sexual harassment under the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), a sexually objectionable work environment must be both objectively and subjectively offensive, one that a reasonable person would find hostile or abusive, and one that the victim in fact did perceive to be so. The Court noted that FEHA is not a “civility code” and is not designed to rid the workplace of vulgarity; while the FEHA prohibits harassing conduct that creates a work environment that is hostile or abusive on the basis of sex, it does not outlaw sexually coarse and vulgar language or conduct that merely offends.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision