Canoga Park Employment Attorneys

The employment attorneys of the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stand ready to fight for both employers and employees in Canoga Park, California.

Canoga Park, California

Canoga Park is one of the larger neighborhoods in the City of Los Angeles.  It is situated in the west San Fernando Valley and is home to more than 60,000 Angelenos.  It covers approximately nine square miles, and encompasses the following zip codes: 91303, 91304, 91305, and 91309.  Before the Mexican American War, the district was part of a rancho, and after the American victory it was converted into wheat farms and then subdivided, with part of it named Owensmouth as a town founded in 1912. It joined Los Angeles in 1917 and was renamed Canoga Park on March 1, 1931. Canoga Park is known for its fantastic weather and central location close to many of the top attractions in the region. In Canoga Park, there are various cafes, restaurants, parks, and shopping areas, such as the Shops at Vallarta and Westfield Topanga & the Village. A number of festivals and events take place in Canoga Park throughout the year, including the Dia de los Muertos Festival and the Canoga Park Memorial Day Parade. On June 25, 2005, Canoga Park was named an All-America City. The Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is headquartered in the City of Burbank which is minutes away from Canoga Park.  Thus, the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C. offers legal services to both employees and employers in the Canoga Park area.

Finding The Best Employment Lawyers in Canoga Park Is Easy

Because of its central location, Canoga Park offers its residents many choices in terms of lawyers.  There are countless lawyers and law firms offering their services to Canoga Park residents.  In fact, some of them would break down your door and rush into your living room to make a sales pitch if they could. When employers and employees in Canoga Park face serious legal issues, and real-world legal challenges involving employment law, the difficulty they face is knowing which lawyer is the right choice for them.  The search can be made even more difficult by the constant onslaught of gimmicky radio ads and cheesy posters plastered on billboards, buses, and street benches.  Most folks will try to find someone online, but an online search for “Canoga Park employment lawyer” or “wrongful termination attorney in Canoga Park” may lead to search results replete with paid advertisements from billboard lawyers.  For certain cases, a billboard lawyer may be an excellent choice.  There are, however, other cases which require quality representation of the highest caliber from experienced counsel.  Each attorney at the Akopyan Law Firm, A.P.C. has almost two decades of experience.  Our lawyers have a proven track record of success for both employers and employees. The firm’s approach is to focus on quality, not quantity.  Our lawyers prefer to spend our time in the courtroom fighting for their clients’ rights, instead of the recording studio recording catchy radio ads.  We don’t want you to take our word for it; We will gladly provide client references upon request.  You can of course also check out our reviews online.  With offices just minutes away from Canoga Park, we stand ready to provide legal representation of the highest caliber to residents of Canoga Park.

Canoga Park Residents Can Contact Us To Discuss Cases Involving:

Featured Employment Case:

Morgan v. Regents of Univ. of Cal., 88 Cal. App. 4th 52 (2000)

The employee in this case brought an action against his former employer, a state university, for employment discrimination and retaliation. The Superior Court, granted summary judgment in favor of the former employer. The  employee appealed. The Court of Appeal, held that: (1) “continuing violations theory” did not apply to allow consideration of Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) claims that were not preceded by a timely administrative complaint; and (2) that the employee failed to establish causal link between his filing a racial discrimination grievance and former employer’s failure to rehire him; and (3) that former employer provided legitimate, nondiscriminatory reasons for not rehiring employee.  The appelate court affirmed.  The court examined the continuing violation doctrine as it applies to statutory employment claims.  The Court stated as follows:  A continuing violation may be established by demonstrating “a company wide policy or practice” or “a series of related acts against a single individual.” (Green v. Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools (9th Cir.1989) 883 F.2d 1472, 1480.) “The continuing violation theory generally has been applied in the context of a continuing policy and practice of discrimination on a company-wide basis; a plaintiff who shows that a policy and practice operated at least in part within the limitation period satisfies the filing requirements. [A] systematic policy of discrimination is actionable even if some or all of the events evidencing its inception occurred prior to the limitations period. The reason is that the continuing system of discrimination operates against the employee and violates his or her rights up to a point in time that falls within the applicable limitations period. Such continuing violations are most likely to occur in the matter of placements or promotions.” (Green v. Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools, supra, 883 F.2d 1472, 1480; Williams v. Owens–Illinois, Inc. (9th Cir.1982) 665 F.2d 918, 924; West v. Philadelphia Elect. Co., supra, 45 F.3d 744, 755.) The plaintiff must demonstrate that at least one act occurred within the filing period and that “the harassment is ‘more than the occurrence of isolated or sporadic acts of intentional discrimination.’ [Citation.] The relevant distinction is between the occurrence of isolated, intermittent acts of discrimination and a persistent, on-going pattern.” (West v. Philadelphia Elec. Co., supra, 45 F.3d at p. 755.)… Cases alleging a hostile work environment due to racial or sexual harassment are often found to come within the continuing violations framework. (E.g., Accardi v, Superior Court, supra, 17 Cal.App.4th at p. 349–351, 21 Cal.Rptr.2d 292 [10–year course of sexual harassment of female police officer]; Watson v. Department of Rehabilitation (1989) 212 Cal.App.3d 1271, 1291, 261 Cal.Rptr. 204 [“campaign of retaliatory harassment” against employee who complained about employer’s failure to promote her]; Anthony v. County of Sacramento (E.D.Cal.1995) 898 F.Supp. 1435, 1443 [“hostile environment harassment … by its nature involves an ongoing course of conduct rather than a single discrete act”].) Morgan v. Regents of Univ. of Cal., 88 Cal. App. 4th 52, 64–67, 105 Cal. Rptr. 2d 652, 662–64 (2000)

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision