Buena Park Employment Attorneys

The trial attorneys of the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. stand ready to fight for both employers and employees in Buena Park, California.

Buena Park, California

Buena Park is a city located in Orange County.  Buena Park is home to more than 80,000 residents.  It covers approximately ten square miles, and encompasses the following zip codes: 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, and 90624. Local settlers referred to the area as “Plaza Buena” which means “good park” in Spanish. The mix of the Spanish and English languages to name Buena Park reflects the major historical influences in the area. James A. Whitaker founded Buena Park in 1887 when he bought 690 acres of land from Abel Stearns. Whitaker opened a general merchandise store, helped found a church, and began cultivating economic development aided by the transcontinental railroad’s initial arrival in southern Los Angeles County. In 1889 Whitaker got the Pacific Creamery Company, which canned condensed milk under the Lily Cream label, to build a factory in Buena Park. This was the first industry established in Orange County. The City of Buena Park was incorporated in 1953.  With offices in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, and Riverside the Akopyan Law Firm A.P.C. is just minutes away from Buena Park. Our employment lawyers stand ready to provide world-class services and top-notch representation to the residents of Buena Park.

Tips for Finding The Best Wrongful Termination Lawyers in Buena Park

Finding the best employment lawyer in Buena Park can be a crucial step when facing legal challenges in the field of employment law. Here are some tips to help you in your search:

1. **Ask for Recommendations:** Start by seeking recommendations from friends, family, or colleagues who may have had experience with employment lawyers in the area. Personal referrals can be a valuable way to find trustworthy attorneys.

2. **Check Professional Organizations:** Look for employment lawyers who are members of reputable professional organizations. Membership can indicate a commitment to high professional standards.

3. **Online Research:** While online searches can yield paid advertisements, they can also provide valuable information about an attorney’s qualifications, client reviews, and areas of expertise. Pay attention to client testimonials and reviews on platforms like Google, Yelp, or Avvo.

4. **Consultations:** Schedule initial consultations with prospective attorneys. During these meetings, ask about their experience in employment law, their success record, and their approach to handling cases. Assess their communication skills and whether you feel comfortable working with them.

5. **Specialization:** Look for lawyers who specialize in employment law. Employment law is a complex field, and attorneys with a specific focus are more likely to have in-depth knowledge of relevant laws and regulations.

6. **Client References:** Don’t hesitate to request references from past clients. Speaking with previous clients can provide insights into an attorney’s performance, communication, and ability to achieve favorable outcomes.

7. **Legal Fees:** Discuss the attorney’s fee structure during your consultation. Ensure you have a clear understanding of how fees will be calculated, whether it’s hourly rates, contingency fees, or another arrangement.

8. **Office Location:** Consider the location of the attorney’s office. Having an office close to Buena Park can be convenient for meetings and court appearances.

9. **Case Evaluation:** Ask the attorney for an honest evaluation of your case, including the strengths and weaknesses. A reliable lawyer should provide a realistic assessment of your situation.

10. **Trust Your Instincts:** Ultimately, choose an attorney you feel comfortable with and who inspires confidence. Your relationship with your lawyer is essential for effective communication and collaboration throughout your case.

Remember that finding the right employment lawyer in Buena Park may take some time and research, but it’s a crucial step in ensuring that your legal needs are met with the highest level of expertise and professionalism.

We Can Help Buena Park Residents With Cases Involving:

Featured Employment Case

Phillips v. St. Mary Reg’l Med. Ctr., 96 Cal. App. 4th 218 (2002)

In this case, Plaintiff Frederick Phillips filed a wrongful termination action against defendant St. Mary Regional Medical Center, a nonprofit religious corporation, alleging that defendant retaliated against him for filing a complaint for race and sex discrimination with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Plaintiff claimed that defendant violated the public policy set forth in the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), article I, section 8 of the California Constitution (Section 8), and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). In response to a demurrer filed by defendant, the trial court found, as a matter of law, that plaintiff failed to state a cause of action for wrongful termination because the cited authorities were inadequate to overcome the religious-entity exemption under the pre-amended version of FEHA. In challenging the court’s decision sustaining defendant’s demurrer, plaintiff argued that all three sources of public policy were adequate to support his claims for wrongful termination. Although the appellate court reject plaintiff’s reliance on FEHA, it agreed with plaintiff that Section 8 and Title VII are alternative sources of fundamental and well-established public policy sufficient to support plaintiff’s common law cause of action for wrongful termination.  Accordingly, it reversed the trial court’s judgment. The Court’s opinion explained as follows: “The tort cause of action for wrongful termination in violation of public policy provides a vehicle for recourse that otherwise would be unavailable under general rules of the at-will employment doctrine. First recognized by the California Supreme Court in Tameny v. Atlantic Richfield Co., this public policy exception allows an employee to bring a tort cause of action against an employer who terminates an at-will employment on a ground that violates fundamental public policy. The exception is based on the principle that, although an employer may terminate an at-will employee for no reason, or any arbitrary or irrational reason, the employer has no power to terminate the employee for a reason contrary to the law or fundamental public policy. Despite broad acceptance of the public policy exception, “[t]he difficulty … lies in determining where and how to draw the line between claims that genuinely involve matters of public policy, and those that concern merely ordinary disputes between employer and employee. This determination depends in large part on whether the public policy alleged is sufficiently clear to provide the basis for such a potent remedy.” To support a wrongful discharge claim, the policy must be “(1) delineated in either constitutional or statutory provisions; (2) ‘public’ in the sense that it ‘inures to the benefit of the public’ rather than serving merely the interests of the individual; (3) well established at the time of the discharge; and (4) substantial and fundamental.” By limiting the sources of public policy to constitutional and statutory provisions, the California Supreme Court recognized that the concept of public policy was “notoriously resistant to precise definition.” Thus, “courts should venture into this area, if at all, with great care and due deference to the judgment of the legislative branch, ‘lest they mistake their own predilections for public policy which deserves recognition at law.’ [Citation.]” Moreover, “[a] public policy exception carefully tethered to fundamental policies that are delineated in constitutional or statutory provisions strikes the proper balance among the interests of employers, employees and the public. The employer is bound, at a minimum, to know the fundamental public policies of the state and nation as expressed in their constitutions and statutes; so limited, the public policy exception presents no impediment to employers that operate within the bounds of law. Employees are protected against employer actions that contravene fundamental state policy. And society’s interests are served through a more stable job market, in which its most important policies are safeguarded.” Phillips, at 225–27.  The Court went on to say that “The employer is bound, at a minimum, to know the fundamental public policies of the state and nation as expressed in their constitutions and statutes; so limited, the public policy exception presents no impediment to employers that operate within the bounds of law.”  Phillips, at 234.

 Avvo Rating 10 Superb

   

Millions of Dollars Recovered For Our Clients

Check Out Our Case Results

$6.131 MillionEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$3.85 MillionEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$950 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$800 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$750 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$700 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$658 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$650 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$375 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$325 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$300 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination / Race Discrimination
$295 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$265 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$250 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$250 ThousandEmployment Law: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$240 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$200 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$199 ThousandEmployment: Pregnancy Discrimination
$195 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$193 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$180 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$175 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$175 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$174 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$167 ThousandEmployment: Wage and Hour
$160 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Wages
$158 ThousandBreach of Contract
$150 ThousandEmployment: Reverse Race Discrimination
$130 ThousandEmployment: Race Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Sexual Harassment
$125 ThousandEmployment: Disability Discrimination
$125 ThousandEmployment: Medical Leave Retaliation
$120 ThousandEmployment: Unpaid Commission Wages
$120 ThousandEmployment: Retaliation
$120 ThousandPersonal Injury: Automobile Collision
$107 ThousandEmployment: Whistleblower Retaliation
$100 ThousandEmployment: Religious Discrimination
$100 ThousandEmployment: Failure to Accommodate
$100 ThousandEmployment: Wrongful Termination
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Bicycle Collision
$100 ThousandPersonal Injury: Pedestrian Collision